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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 135 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:00pm EDT
of grievances that the united states had against great britain in the early 19th century. many are associated with maritime disputes between great britain and the united states because this is the middle of that -- napolian wars. they are trying to establish trade, and they are impressing seamen from american vessels because they need to script crews to keep the royal navy manned because they were disputing with the british and the indians on the frontier, and british policy affected the prizes very badly, and prizes for american exports slumped during this period causing an agricultural depression making people angry. there's a whole range of those sort of grievances. basically, i think why the war was ultimately fought and why it was fought when it was because many of the disputes have been preceded in 1812 by a number of years without necessarily producing the declaration of war was that by the summer of 1811, the main grievance was something called the council, a british form of executive order, the american equivalent is the executive order issued by the president, and through the execut
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:00am EDT
of the more tangled problems. historians point* two grievances the united states had against great britain. many are associated with maritime disputes because this is the middle of the napoleonic wars. and the british need to keep them were real baby manned and then the gap british and the then very badly route the period so there is a range of those grievances. the reason it was fought to this many disputes were preceded by a number of years with the summer of 1811 the main grievance was the council. our british form of the executive order. but the british proclaims sweeping blockades designed to stop the new trolls. from taking the experts and the produce in europe. they have been disputing this and it seems it could be negotiated. and the event that the british will not were a. >> it is hard to do public opinion likely due but is the most important but to declaration incongruous were not by wide margins in the house of representatives. it was very close in the senate. 19/13 if three boats had changed the senate, it could not pass the war bell. and it debated near the two weeks and it wa
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 9:00am EDT
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now comcast your mind back -- cast your mind back to a decade ago, that question would seem absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would he need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we have become to the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke i heard probably about 5000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19 century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is taking up washington in a remote area and the soldier rides up and he declares old woman, from this day forth, this man -- this land is no longer politically his imperial russian. she watches him go. thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i will pass those laughs on to my fat
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
have china china assets from the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation that would somehow cause them to butt heads as they did in 1953, so i think any time there is a serious thought given to some sort of military action this is constantly at the top, not even the top even halfway up the escalation ladder this is constantly the concern that i think every u.s. president has had to think about seriously, so that is certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, the united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became the top foreign policy issue on which the head ministrations of a resolution. now, we can debate whether there was the right or wrong finger. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think nothing was resolved and, you know, that's a completely different question. i think the plant for korea is i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority. it's been a crisis the you want to solve at least in the sense of preventing
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 2:40pm EDT
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00pm EDT
a bigger problem within diplomacy. but the united states has been willing to use both force and diplomacy to really try to solve the problem. i think in the case of north korea, that that -- it's just not registered like that. that is not specific to any administration. we have had crises with north korea and every administration has made the same calculation. when we reach a crisis with north korea, are we willing to go all-out to the end to solve this thing, or do we want a solution that will park it momentarily, put him diplomatic tracks, present and kevin and want move on to the other issues that most concern us, whether it is the domestic and economic situation or iraq or afghanistan or syria or the middle east peace process. these tend to be the more it important issues in u.s. foreign policy. >> the other issue that makes iraq different is the u.s. korea alliance. have you see the dynamics of the alliance playing into our ability to adjust the top concerns that the u.s. has related to north korea's nuclear program? >> undeniably, and when we look at the situation, south korea is mo
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. china sits right on the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation or a configuration of the peninsula that would cause the two to butt heads as they did in 1953, and so i think any time there is serious thought given to some sort of military action, this is constantly at the top -- not even the top, but half way up the ladder, this is a concern that every u.s. president, i think, has had to think about seriously. i think that's certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became thee top foreign policy issue on which the administration saw a revolution, a final resolution. now, we can debate whether that was the right or wrong thing. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think that nothing was resolved there, and, you know, that's a completely different question. i mean i think the point for korea is that i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority for an administration. it's been a c
CSPAN
May 21, 2012 1:25am EDT
themselves to interpret the picture. but let me see. separating from the rest of the world, the united states of america. filet and i have adopted as my home. it has paid less and less literally to the translation. there has been a lot of more translation of english literature than there was from the land that many considered to be the end of the. >>host: is there a contemporary woman right to you would recommend? >>guest: absolutely. let me say first in spite of the islamic republic or because it is usually u.s. wants. the big men are center stage. one example. 1947 the first major collection of short stories pro but then passed away a couple of weeks ago. at the age of 19. when they pull it goes back and cannot you don't need a directors, crew, the women are formed in the segregated society. 1947 you have those 30 equal to the number of men. but look gain at conscientious when this talk about the national poets of our country. not recognized by the government but by the people. inside and outside that could to save. the first time has become day woman from my country. >>host: we're really l
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 1:40pm EDT
? >> the civil rights section is a unit of the government that was created in 1939 in the united states, just before world war ii. when it was created, it was part of the department of justice, and then it was created, it was thought to be -- it's charge was to protect individual rights, fundamental individual rights. but people were not exactly sure what that meant. with a first thought it meant was labor rights. the rights of workers trying to collectively organize into unions. when world war ii started, race became much more prominent on the national political scene. the civil rights section started to think about how to protect the rights of african-americans. as a result they started to think about how to protect the rights of african-american workers. in the 1940s, it the civil rights takes a whole bunch of cases, and it prosecutes all kinds of employers for violation of civil rights causes. >> was informed by order or legislation? >> it was formed by executive order, franklin roosevelt, and at the request of frank murphy, who was the attorney general. frank murphy was a big labor guy f
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 12:20pm EDT
incomes were growing more equal in the united states and the great divergence which is a period when incomes were growing more unequal. the pattern towards greater income equality from 34 to 79 was so pronounced that a whole economic theory was built around the idea that this is simply what happened in an advanced industrial economy after the disruption of industrialization in the late 19th and early 20th century, this was theorized you would expect to see a steadily, a move towards tedly more equal -- steadily more equal income. simon -- [inaudible] who formulated this theory essentially said -- he didn't put it quite this way -- but he essentially said it was the mark of a civilized nation that incomes had become more equal. but as you can see, we started becoming uncivilized in 1979. here you see that the trend, the income share of the top 1% which has doubled since 1979 is growing faster the higher up the income scale you go. so it's really being driven by the richest of the rich. when i say income share, i mean the the percentage of the nation's collective income that is going t
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 6:00pm EDT
distrust and resentment of the united states can be traced to the mexican war. the mexican war also hastened the civil war. it might not have been fought if the mexican war had not opened the volatile slavery debate. now, the mexican war's often confused with the texan war for independence from mexico ten years earlier in 1836. the texas revolution is known for the battles of the alamo and san ha sin toe -- ha seen toe and the exploits of sam houston and davy crockett. the mexican war is known as polk's war. the 11th president, james k. polk, supervised it from its beginning in may 1846 to the treaty signing 21 months later. the peace treaty transferred 530,000 square miles from mexico to the united states, incredible territory. from mexico we obtained the future states of california, new mexico, arizona, nevada, utah and parts of colorado and wyoming. literally 42% of mexico's territory at that time. the major battles were fought at palo alto, monterey and buena vista, the gates of mexico city. always outnumbered, the americans won every major battle. sometimes, as in buena vista,
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:45am EDT
that refused to fight in the united states for example eugene debs rose to give a tour against american participation in the war and was sent to prison and was still in prison in november 1920 when he received nearly a million votes for president on the socialist ticket. another america the pioneer social worker jane addams also was a strong opponent of the war for more than 500 americans were jailed as conscientious objectors including these two at fort riley arkansas. in germany the great radical spoke out against the war and britain the meeting philosopher was most elegant of the war a hero for me writing this book. i will review one thing if you want describing the feeling he rode and i appreciate him because of this intellectual bravery and acknowledging the conflict in his feelings which is something that often most of us don't do when we take a political stand. they describe themselves as being tortured by patriotism as ardently as any retired colonel. love of them was the strongest the motion i possessed and in a period setting aside such a moment making it difficult as truth, t
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:25pm EDT
or literary figures from the rest of the world, as you know. united states of america, the land i love and have adopted as my home, in recent decades has paid less and less attention. especially to literary translation. in the last 32 years come in the number of books translated, there has been a lot more translation of english literature in several countries than there has been in america. >> host: is there a contemporary writer in iran that you would recommend for people? >> guest: absolutely. let me first say that in spite of the islamic, or perhaps because of it, the lechery regime is going down in iran. and women are in center stage. i can give you one example about women. in 1947, we have the first major collection of short stories. there is a novelist but unfortunately passed away a couple of weeks ago. at the age of 90. women poets in iran go back several thousand years. poetry is more of a woman's thinking, act come and form. you don't need to go to a studio, you don't need directors, you don't need a cruel. it is a women's art. in 1947, it is the fifth major literary [inaudib
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 8:30pm EDT
the response would be in the united states you have human rights problem to. that is not a comparable discussion of. >> thank you for having me back. i like to be where the audience is a gauge. i am delighted to speak to an audience who want to be here. [laughter] i am flattered you took your evening to come listen to me. my students are interested but i know if they did not have a test or papers or held accountable most seats would be empty. so i buydown flattering. i could give you a test at the end. i will tell you about arid her and why i wrote a book about him called "the heartbreak of aaron burr." i cannot tell you the whole story without giving away the ending and i don't want to because not just because i want you to buy the book but the reason i wrote the book in the first place. and in particular quality at a question my mother put to me. it goes to the heart of why people write. i t trading to graduate students. those who also completed the come from history and communications, and the english department and the finance. they are apprentice writers
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 10:00am EDT
. and the united states. so as i said at the beginning, 2010 was the summer of hate, two years ago. and you probably remember terry jones who promised to burn a copy of the quran. you might remember the beginning of an anti-sharia movement that pushes to pass legislation at a state level to ban sharia law, islamic law. it starts in oklahoma where there's this huge muslim population. no, there's knotts a huge miss -- there's not a huge muslim population in oklahoma. it's ridiculous, and the whole movement is ridiculous since there have been no cases of sharia law actually being cited with one exception in new jersey which was then overturned. and, of course, you remember that summer as well as two years before all of the rumors that obama, our president, is muslim. one-third of all republicans believed this according to polling at the time. one-quarter of the entire electorate believes this. and, of course, the ground zero mosque. the ground zero mosque becomes a political litmus test to determine how politicians stand on this key issue. mayor bloomberg, for it. newt gingrich, he's against i
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 4:30pm EDT
for this is the books are conceived as a history of the united states sort of as told through biographies. and i was looking for a woman subject for one of these. and, in fact, i found one, but my publisher wouldn't let me do it. can you guess what woman i was looking for and found? eleanor roosevelt. i mean, just the fact that it's a very short list of women who played a large role in american public life on whom i can hang a tale of four or five decades of american history. women have had, of course, their roles in private life, but it's in the nature of private life that it usually doesn't survive in historical record. why did people start saving the letters of eleanor roosevelt? because she was important. do your correspondents save your letters that you write to them? and then do they deposit them in the local historical society? [laughter] well, maybe. and if they do, you will become -- i use my words advisedly here -- you will be become, literally, immortal. you'll become immortal in letters because future historians will find those letters and say, ah. so that's what life was like at the
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 6:00pm EDT
the aircraft. he flies the airplane 1600 miles across the united states making a stop in st. louis on the way and setting a transcontinental flying record of 21 hours and 40 minutes. and when he gets to new york, there's a very short window of opportunity for him to actually take off. when he hasn't slept, i think, for a night, he's awake the entire time of his flight. he drifts off now and then, but comes back realizing how dangerous it is for him to fall asleep. but it's estimated he was awake for, what, 60 hours bob? 63 hours before he made the flight, so he was very, very tired. i'm sorry, i guess 33 hours on the flight and then 30 hours beforehand. so the whole flight is really about struggling to stay wake. and make no mistake about it, this was a dangerous flight. first of all, by crossing, by taking the route that he took, the polar route, he extended the distance that anyone had ever flown across the atlantic. and there had been others who had flown the atlantic before lindbergh. the distinction here, and it's an important distinction, is that he did it nonstop and solo. so he takes
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. especially for the united states and others in the region. .. >> the other is dr. james wright is an american historian, president emeritus of dartmouth college and a marine. i and the director emeritus of the memorial association board of directors. first a few quick words of the non-profit federal organization chartered to commemorate the valor of members of the united states armed forces killed lost or died in military service for broke above the list of duties for the marine memorial association we are responsible for maintaining the extraordinary club -- club as a memorial to pay tribute to those who carry-on. to lourdes board visit our web site at marine club.com. please turn off your cellphones and any other noisemakers you may have. this wednesday may 9th paula bravo will speak all biden. the indication of general petraeus and was imbedded in his death in she adds, -- has hundreds of hours to tell the inside story of his development and leadership from every vantage point*. last, you have question cards. i would make use of those cards that is how we will handle q&a. please hand them
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 11:00pm EDT
dangerous, including full-scale war. and because the united states is allied with japan, with the philippines, and with other countries in the region, there's a strong risk of u.s. involvement in any such clash, and if you have been following developments in washington, you'll know that president obama and secretary of state hillary clinton have said that with the war in iraq and afghanistan over, the center of gravity of american military policy from now on is going to be the south china sea, and it's going to involve u.s. naval power deployed in the area to support the countries that have clashed with china over these disputed territories. so this is becoming the most dangerous, in my view, the most dangerous area in the world, with respect to the possibility of u.s.-china conflict. i also worry that similar clashes will occur in other disputed maritime areas, like the caspian sea and the faulkland islands, and nobody paid much attention since the last war but now that the uk is drilling in the contested area. othe faulklands, tensions with argentina have heeded up aga
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 12:25am EDT
. if they refuse to me in a nice way of them i lost faith in the united states of america. i have always believed before that the people from the justice when they couldn't anywhere else in the world. she then learned about the civil rights conference and begged them to help me. then they gave me courage to keep funding to win. i remember you when i was a girl how interested you were in negro people. please help me now. my people can't stand these police brutality is much longer. please answer. eleanor roosevelt wrote to several people she knew in new jersey and putting the attorney-general, they all assured the supreme court in the appeal would treat this case and a very fair manner and see that justice was done so eleanor roosevelt wrote that back bessie mitchell. the next bit was after the convictions were overturned on all six by the new jersey supreme court is that the speaker is paul robeson. i think some of you may know who he was, a fantastic human being, a huge black guy. he could sing, he could act, he was an athlete who was very active in civil rights and his time. the wealth of the u.
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 11:40am EDT
. [inaudible] >> elaborate on the impact of the united states entry into the war. >> to elaborate on the impact of the united states entry to the war. the united states was part of the war effort from the beginning because we were selling large amounts of armaments to britain and france, not to germany and much of those sales on credit. because they were on credit, one impact of the war was to make the united states enormously wealthy because everybody ended up owing us money at the end of the war. militarily the u.s. entered the war in april of 1917, about a year and six months before the end. there was an enormous psychological boost for the our eyes when they u.s. entered. there wasn't much direct military effect immediately except on the oceans because of the u.s. had a surprisingly small standing army at that time. we did have quite a large navy which joined the british in hunting down german submarines. large numbers of american troops didn't begin arriving in france until may or june of 1918 and then they did have a considerable impact because the germans had launched a sort of desperate
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:15am EDT
is not going to have the same kind partnership with the united states. it is going to be a rival for the united states when he see ec projections of how the global economy will turn out. many people expect india to overtake the u.s. by the middle of this century. there is an opportunity to build that partnership, and the danger could be that brazil becomes a rival to the united states, which i don't think will be a healthy thing. my suggestion was strategically it makes sense to back up her cell. >> that is a good, strong points. >> there's no reason why they shouldn't be better friends. >> my wife is from there, so there's no problem. [applause] >> one of the problems we talked about was social inclusion. we will next be looking at ethnicity, gender, as well as rights. keep an eye out for that. let's join all of our panelists and thank them for coming up here. especially john. [applause] [applause] he is able to sign books. if you'd like your book signed, i highly recommend it. we will be sticking around. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] cement is there a nonfiction author o
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 1:00pm EDT
>> exams the current debates over what constitutes united states citizenship and ways to reimagine the process. this is about an hour and ten minutes. [applause] >> gregory, thank you so much for that introduction. it is truly an honor to be with you here tonight. i think i need to say a word about gregory and about zocalo and their new partnership with cal humanities and virginia necessary. -- vanessa. for those of you who are newcomers, this is one of the most remarkable instances of civic engagement that i have seen in the united states, and you all are part of it, you make it happen. and i think one of the things that we forget when we talk about big concepts like citizenship is that what it boils down to in the most simple way is whether or not you show up. it's kind of all it boils down to, whether or not each one of us decides in ways large and be small to show up. and gregory and his remarkable team in creating this set of forums has held a space for us, but it's upon all of you here who have decided to show up on a very nice evening that helps give me hope for citizenship.
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 10:00am EDT
of the function the united states. they didn't want to put it on the front page. 9/11 happened 10 or 11 weeks later. ever since then, i have been following al qaeda and terrorism as much as peter has. starting in 2002, i got a tip. we mentioned this in the prologue of the book. i was in a bar in new york city talking to a bunch of agents who were from the fbi task force there. in comes the bomb squad, who were the investigators to the 9/11 plot. after we were talking about terrorism, because they couldn't talk about investigation, i said give me a table or it leads go on. one of them said, he looked around and said in a stage whisper, gentoo. i wrote it on a cocktail napkin and started making calls the next day. the reason i mention this, writing about all of jim al qaeda and osama bin laden, ksm already unction always stood out as much more different than the others. he seemed more politically oriented than others. he liked to have a good time come he had a sense of humor come he was much more organized. gsm was the one who is traveling around the world getting things done, doing things and
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 10:00pm EDT
states is actually making a difference. -- [inaudible] >> why is the united states different click >> it's interesting because what she'd said i would've agreed with just a few years ago, but it's no longer true. by and large there's a lot of resistance to moving away from fossil fills. where nicole stayed. it's understandable. people in this state have made their livelihood for generations of coal and it's understandable that they're nervous about talk. i understand this year that were just going to take away their jobs. we can't do that. we have to transition and make sure that there's jobs available to replace the ones. they're such a history of fossils that reliance in our in australia unless our two countries where you've seen the greatest resistance. but over the past few years is essentially moved backward under stephen harper, the current prime minister they pulled out of the kyoto accord. so they've actually gone in the wrong direction you damage is not much in the right direction. they've actually gone backwards. i wish a step in canada a week ago in toronto talking to people t
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 8:30pm EDT
difficult jobs in the united states government former administrator of the tsa. someone came to the issue after 9/11 with the faa perspective also from the private sector with supply chain, risk, that we talk about today with aviation security. the verbs are not always the same as the now not only to comment on his time with the tsa but also a bit of a landscape where we are, where we hope to be with major gaps and shortfalls that we can enhance the country's capability. this is one of the toughest jobs. most people's impression is the dna are irs that is the next agency that has the most contact in the environment they have an important mission. shortly after 9/11 there were steps in what that needed to be taken and quickly. we have to ask the hard questions and you are here to make us smarter. if you have not bought it yet, "permanent emergency" buy it. doing the interviews call in this have to do with your book. the floor is yours. >> thank you for the introduction and for hosting this. praying this consistently same voice in the of the why is it discombobulated world and it is an hono
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 4:15pm EDT
that survey is seven years of u.s. security policy to argue that the united states has gone terribly awry trying to make itself save. david's basic point is that the institutions we have built and policies we have established to ensure our national security were originally designed to fight not cmac germany and waged a cold war against the soviet union. they weren't conceived to protect us against today's international terrorism and other 21st century threats david argues that since the time of roosevelt and truman, we have slipped into what he calls a permanent self renewing state of emergency. marked by excessive secret agencies and a kind of imperial presidency, and our constitution had never intended that. the results have been an increasingly complicated, costly and ineffectual security system that has damaged our democracy, undermine the our economic strength, and ironically, david argues, left us more vulnerable. david doesn't just describe, he also prescribes. the final part of his book contains a blueprint for the future. as you might imagine from his searing critique, the soluti
CSPAN
May 29, 2012 12:45am EDT
in this country when we are taking away all their jobs? my view is if it can be made in the united states it should be made in the united states. in hamilton you go to those old republicans -- [applause] they believe that. the old republicans that built this economy, hamilton, henry clay, lincoln, mckinley. we wrote a book the great betrayal. they are discouraged in the free trade. they believed free trade because we are going to dump our goods there and charge tariffs on goods coming in here. they were not about a level playing field, they were about winning. >> a lot of liberals would agree and i remember one story they told me someone came to interview you and she was right you had a very long hair. she said i think he may have been gay. [laughter] you're the first that spoken about the power in politics. >> i think that it was in iowa and a fellow came along and i think that he was gay, he had a hearing and stuff. [laughter] most of the time when i grew up they didn't have a hearings and stuff. but he was in the car with me driving along asking me questions and he was clearly a left w
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 2:00pm EDT
population within the united states. some of which was real, and some of which was imagined. here in debaters burg where we celebrate diverseity those dark moments in the nation's history should give us pause. standing a few miles away from at same washington, d.c., where hoover was raised and ascended to extraordinary power, we should take this opportunity to learn from ken's they thorough and fascinatingability of the adult difficult times. in so doing we can recommit ourselves to the value of freedom -- the pows to be and checks of balances understanding these make for a stronger, not a weaker america. so without adieu, ladies and gentlemen, ken ackerman, author of young j. edgar. [applause] thank you. can you hear me all right? okay. thanks for the terrific introduction. i thank you very much. thank you to coming out on a beautiful afternoon here in gathers burg and staying here in the c-span tent. i know, there's a lot of competition. and thank you for c-span for being the best friend of non-fiction book writers. -- when i was first asked to be here, it was last november, and last novemb
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 1:30pm EDT
population in the united states. midterm elections, the turnouts can be tiny by comparison with their president's a year. it is who is unhappiest, who is most upset, his angriest. most of the people that turn out disproportionately. it is why we have presence suffering that midterms. >> larry sabato, let's take two years, two dozen six and 2010. differences? will was the electric? >> almost a mirror opposites. that is not to say you didn't have plenty of people voting in 2006 she showed up again at the polls and to doesn't, in 2006, george bush's sixth year election, we often call it the six year itch. week entitled that preceded the electorate was angry at wish, mainly on account of the iraq war. there was a strong anti bullish trend that was discernible, even in republican red seats. so democrats took control of both the house in the senate. the bush presidency it legislatively was over after the day of the election. still conducted for policy, had become a power and it is still issue administrative regulation, but it changes the character of his presidency industry, or v
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 5:15pm EDT
manually by people and great control centers all over the united states. they were 21st day, seven days a week and they have to maintain the balance on a minute by minute basis all throughout the day. the second thing we need to learn is that his technology can fail for a really long time and still end up becoming something completely ubiquitous to the way we live. i think there's a lot of analogies between the history of the life of an history of solar power because i've had people tell me, while solar cells were invented in 1840s, people out pushed this is the energy solutions the 1970s, but they're still expensive and so not really widely used, so clearly they are a failure and we should move on. if you look at the history of the label, you can see technology can fill on a technological basis for 80 years hentgen fail for another 40 and still end up having something we are completely dependent upon today. finally, we need to learn that it changes the completely sweep the nation are not necessarily things that happened individual by individual. we don't have an electric grid system to
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 8:00am EDT
, challenging interests. looks like you have another question. >> looks like the united states made -- why is it like that when another industrialized country agree upon the facts both regard to the conservative versus liberals impacting true lives. how is that different? >> it's interesting. what you said i would have agreed with just a few years ago, but it's no longer true. by and large, there's been a lot of resistance in moving from fossil fuels on countries that essentially built their economies. it's a coal state. that's how a generation made their livelihoods on coal. it's understanding there's talk about moving away from that. i understand that why, you know, the fear we're going to take away the jobs, and we can't do that. we have to transition into new -- make sure there's jobs available to replace the ones that are disappearing. there's such history of relicense in our country and australia, and those are two countries with the latest resistance. over the past few years, it's early moved back ward rather than forward. under steven harper, the current prime minister, they pulled
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 10:40am EDT
rich people. they refused me in a nice way. then i lost faith in the united states of america. i had always believed before that the people found justice here when they couldn't anywhere else in the world. then i learned about the civil rights congress. i begged them to help me. first, they start to restore my faith in the american people, then they gave me courage to keep fighting to win. i remember you when i was a girl, how interested you were in negro people. please help us now. my people can't stand these police brutalities much longer. i remain humble, betsy mitchell. p.s., please answer. eleanor roosevelt wrote to several people she knew in new jersey including the attorney general. they all assured her that the new jersey supreme court would, in the appeal, would treat this case in a very fair manner and see that justice was done. so eleanor roosevelt wrote that back to betsy mitchell. the next little bit is after the convictions were overturned, all six, by the new jersey supreme court. it is at a mass meeting in trenton. the speaker is paul robison. i think some of you may
CSPAN
May 26, 2012 7:00pm EDT
rights in the united states, that actually we're going to be looking at on march 30th. a whole another discussion, but it's one of the thins that's very inspiring in his story is that he saw so clearly that dignity and injustice, again, african-americans was connected to the discriminatings and the struggles against so many voices, and so, i was wondering for you could start off by talking a little bit about what brought you to his story. tell us for about him and what makes him so exciting as a figure. >> sure. let me say it's great to be with you, and especially great to be near the shon burg archive. so many so thanks for assisting me in the research along the way. [applause] i try to let my projects aorganically one from another. early on when i was studying martin luther king, jr. there was by yard rustin. when i was studying jackie robinson there he was. and when i was studying thurgood martial, the one who was the naacp attorney, there was rustin. it was easy to target him. it was all over the place. he was a fascinating character. to me, he's especially fascinating because he b
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 1:50pm EDT
the united states suffered in the 1930s. a new stage in world succession had threatened the territorial structure of russia. this is why putin was appointed prime minister, to deal with that. nato expansion was proceeding on all fronts with no limits on space and time. russia was virtually a failed state. putin was able to restore an element of order out of chaos and an element out of prosperity out of misery, and it meant international respect and humiliation. this is not the whole picture, to be sure. he presides over a totalitarian political machine. it is more dependent on resources than it was before. citibank, for instance, thinks that the price of oil has to be about $150 per barrel, it is at about $115 now. for the russian government to balance. depending how much they depend on oil revenues. political secession still remains a matter of her politics and not institutionalize rules and procedures. however, most russians look past the procedural element and they see where they came from in the 1990s from the yeltsin. come and they have a very different take on putin. when we compa
CSPAN
May 12, 2012 5:00pm EDT
to be intent on attacking inside the united states instead of targets overseas. my editors, who hopefully won't be listening to this, didn't want to put it on the front page so i had to call the managing editor and we finally got it on the front page and 9/11 happened 10 or 11 weeks later. so ever since then, i've been following al qaeda and terrorism as much as peter has. and starting in 2002, i got a tip, we mentioned this in the prologue of the book, that i was in a bar in new york city, talking to a bunch of agents who were from the fbi joint terrorism task force there. incomes the investigators from the actual 9/11 plot. after talking for hours about terrorism because they couldn't talk about the investigation, i said give me a tip, give me something to go juan, a league, a name. one of them looked around and said in a stage whisper, khalid sheikh mohammed. i wrote it on a cocktail napkin and started making calls the next day. the reason i mention it is because writing about al qaeda and osama bin laden, and in peter's book i can't wait to read, allah was sorry, he stood out as someone t
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 8:00am EDT
basis for success was we in the united states had a better idea than, at that time, the soviet union. or if there are, say, radical terrorists involved, you could simply talk to someone in their family, maybe try to talk them out of it. so, in fact, of those 21 people that he obtained confessions from -- and they were doing a coup -- many of them, there was a few of them that went to jail for some periods of time. none of them were executed. most of them, if not all of them, returned to government service or involvement in the elite, the ruling elite of jordan. so that's one of the secrets to jordan's success or has been one of the secrets to jordan's success and their legitimacy is coercion on the lowest level possible to achieve what you need to achieve. and the lesson, again, is that he thought that we shouldn't be in the torture business. and he was very dismayed by some of the things like waterboarding, etc. both because he thought that the people who did it were not part, were not of the caliber that he thought existed in the cia when he was involved there and because it was co
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 6:45pm EDT
.m. in the morning and said it was the policy of the united states? and smith, not knowing whether it was the policy of the united states, but assuming whatever winston churchill would say must indeed be the policy of the united states, said yes. stalin went into the next room in which the shah's sister was come and announced to her that he was willing to pull russian troops out of iran who were there illegally. and i believe, it was the first victory of the cold war. it is interesting that there has never been a book study of this most important speech. until the light, who is an amateur private scholar, actually, i don't think after the publication of this book i can say amateur anymore, because this is a wonderful history. all the reviews confirm this. john lucas has said about it, but i read are supreme test with considerable care and i recommended in pedigree. there's now an enormous literature about the cold war. the very little about how it actually came about, and almost nothing about this address. this book fills the gap. phil has been a writer and lecturer at the american nazarene universi
CSPAN
May 20, 2012 3:15pm EDT
't particularly fond of the government of the united states. and i think those things are all at work here. and, therefore, what do i recommend? what would i like to happen? what i would like to happen is that we could return to a simpler time when a simple code enacted by a great and decent man, abraham lincoln, would be enough. is it enough? i'm afraid not. but what we're left with is a absolute monstrosity which is so powerfully described in this book. >> thank you, charles. [laughter] >> charles, i wish you would say what you really think. [laughter] >> next time. >> so this is a tremendous book. it is a pleasure to read. every page has insights in it. i'm just going to highlight a couple of themes that are related to but maybe beyond, actually, what jack already summarized and ask a couple of questions. so the subtitle of the book, "the accountable presidency after 9/11," i think, is the most interesting avenue into the book. the book into douses -- into deuces the -- introduces the idea of accountability with new techniques beyond what the constitution actually provided for and at the sam
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
payer health care. the economic freedom of these days are ahead of the united states, about 20 years ago a liberal government saw that they were on the track to go broke as we are now and we cut government spending, not from the way the washington types cut it from what they wanted to spend next year but the cut $6 for every 1 dollar the taxes they raised the heavy slate of homeownership. they've done well in many ways and the canadian dollar the was then worth 70 cents is now worth about a dollar. the government republicans and democrats both want to have the united states be the world's policeman thus the way they are all working. you would ask everybody around here they would find a 80% of the people say we should not. >> in this room i think that this room is pretty hawkish. >> i think you find that they are not. most people look back and say iraq had a good idea, afghanistan we ought to get out, there was a big mistake. most of the world would think we have some questions, so this is different than economics. >> do you have a comment on that? >> i do, i have a chapter on defense, an
CSPAN
May 13, 2012 8:00pm EDT
hates war, use of force and not particularly fond of the denver mint of the united states. those things are all at work. there for what would i like to have been? if we could return to a simpler time when a simple code enacted by a great and decent man would be enough. is it? i am afraid not but we are left with an absolute monstrosity which is so powerfully described in this book. >> i wish you would say what you really think. [laughter] >> next time. [laughter] this is a tremendous book and a pleasure to read every page has insights i will highlight the themes that are related to but beyond what jack summarized. the subtitle comment the accountable presidency after 9/11", is the most interesting avenue. the book introduces the idea of accountability techniques beyond the constitution demonstrating how the branches could interrelate with checks and balances. the new accountability technique is within the existing branches freedom of in permission act created by congress available to other private actors to produce a non transparency. the book demonstrates in the process and results, th
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 1:15am EDT
but alabama. i figured it had to be a deep southern problem. it is all over united states and all over the world. we went to italy to share my story. the french and the japanese sent to reporters to interview me. the chileans newspaper one month ago interviewed me for the second time and they have the same problem. the other countries look at the united states for leadership. there is a lot in the buck. i want to share what we have been the bad. then we opened for questions. you can read anything you want to. i hope you saw a the chris matthews and rachel lived -- rachel mad cow interview that runs on line. hardball was march 16 and on the obama web site of video it's running. they did a good job and sent a professional team. on tuesday we go to harvard to speak tuesday night to. we've been split up. she captured my story extremely well. since this is a local audience side did turn down a movie deal right after the verdict because i wanted the story to be heard across the nation. this important we wake up to stop this from happening. we do not have to except it. we can do something abo
CSPAN
May 5, 2012 1:00pm EDT
to how would you put all the information about a former governor or united states senator's life, doesn't that overwhelm you? it doesn't. if you divide all the research into decades of one's life and then he just work on one folder and the time. my desk is not very messy. one folder and anti. when that folder is completed it goes into the box perhaps my most famous book nationally is wiley post. wiley post was a young man from southern oklahoma who had a six. education, lost his eye in an industrial accident is still became the world's greatest pilot. in 1933 he was the first to solo around the world. in 1934 he discovered that jetstream over oklahoma while attempting to fly to 50,000 feet for the first time. and to fly that high in an airplane that was not pressurized he invented the pressurized flying suit. in this book of former oklahoma astronaut writes that the same basic design that this self educated sixth grade dropout used in developing the suit, the space suit in 1934 is the forerunner of the modern space suit. same design, basically the same premise. my only guiding force is
CSPAN
May 14, 2012 7:00am EDT
century, the average life span of a white man in the united states was 42 years. for a black man was 32 years. our public health system which typified us. we felt we had to do something about that. we felt we had to do something about a lot of things and many of them technological so that we got a jump on the world in terms of technology. we also had a history, not fighting bosnians and the xhosa mars and the serbs. there were no a eleventh century wars to continue to refine. we really did come. one thing i am doing in the book on the japanese in turns is the role of the founding fathers though they were brilliant wonderful men is exaggerated. what made this country great was one group after another came from other parts of the world where there were russians legal irish, japanese, chinese, and fought their way and because in every case the people who were already here, latinos being the newest example tried to keep them out and do was the energy of people trying to move in and building up the contract that made us. during the cold war and certainly now where american exhibition alyssum
CSPAN
May 19, 2012 1:00pm EDT
dramatic in the united states is that the government -- obviously there are global reasons to cause decline, the rise of competition, global competition as a fourth. but i think the reason it is so much worse in the united states is that our government is so much more hostile to organized labor than western european government. and it really began back during labor heyday, 1947 with the passage of the taft hartley law which made it very, very difficult to organize. and i think its effects were not seen for awhile because the labor movement was on the rise among but i think it acted as a slow acting poison on the labour movement. and in the 1980's starting with ronald reagan, actually, before reagan in the last years of the carter administration we started seeing government for, first congress and then the white house under ronald reagan turning against the labor movement. the failure of the major labor bill in 78. we saw of ronald reagan, the union, that obviously was a public union, not a private union. they had a huge impact on the private -- private labor movement as well. president reag
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 10:00pm EDT
. what happened. this is about half an hour. >> hello. i'm marc, the curator of the united states navy memorial, and we are pleased to have you all here for another in our authors on deck book series. most of these have been at noon but some of our high-profile ones like this week in the evening, and just check our web site for information and we can get you on our mailing list. some of the ones we have coming up on june 4th is a part of our celebration of the 70th anniversary of the battle of midway. we will have a ceremony at 9:00 in the morning with the chief of naval operations and honored midway veterans. the odyssey of the curve bricker who outwitted yamamoto at midway it's one of the words really interesting topics and a fantastic day to come down here to the navy memorial to see what we are about the distinguished author fdr final victory the remarkable world war ii presidential campaign. he's done a number of books on fdr and his presidency and this one should be a nice addition to that body of work. on july 19th we will have arctic commissioned 90 degrees north by air ships a
CSPAN
May 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
eric holder, who is attorney general of the united states,. [inaudible] janet napolitano, who was a federal prosecutor verizon at the time, where they risk recruiting people for his plot. i was wondering why you chose not to go after them -- those people who now hold offices of power, who am i think him in my opinion, were directory responsible and chest with a role in the cover-up. first of all, i mentioned right at the beginning of my presentation that when i went to the memorial for the first time in 2001, i really -- it hit home. i talk to people. there was a grandmother that i talk to. when i saw the sad picture on the fence just outside the memorial, that was the moment when something in my stomach flipped and i thought this is just the most ghastly thing that could possibly happen. that emotional reaction is what in many ways sassanian chemie interested in this story for a long time. she is someone i have spoken to on and off for years. i on are people that are able to speak out, they have thoughtful felt like this about what happened to them and why -- absolutely, i sh
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